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on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
the systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can access care at a single point and village across the platform as a whole. we were governmental sponsored plan because it does not encourage innovation and does not encourage competitive aspects. we hope you will get better going forward. >> slightly off-topic, [laughter] >> mr. brousard, i want to comment and give you some background first. i am a humana -- prescriber through my wife's retirement. and generally very satisfied with the program, particularly enjoy the silver sneakers relationship to encourage exercise.
for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
think europe is behind us. unemployment is finding its footing. the housing market is finding its footing. so i think generally we have got clear sailing for 2013. i don't think the market is going to skyrocket. i just don't think we're going to see the wild swings that we have seen the last couple of years. david: david, let me challenge you on that a little bit. tim, we will get to you in a second. you say most of the bad news is behind us, but what if we don't have a deal, and that's still a possibility, we go off the fiscal cliff and as most economists think, we go into a recession. i mean a recession is not priced into this market, is it? >> i think so. david: really? hold on a second, the last time we had a recession the dow went down. >> i don't think there's really many things they can do in congress to avoid a very slow growth economy. whatever they do, it is not going to cause the economy to grow like crazy. i don't think the market is pricing any any kind of major reversal. david: let me be precise here. you are saying specifically that if we go into a recession, a rece
deal or not. futures are up and the dow gained 100 yesterday. but there is room for skepticism. europe's grappling with the same question helped by some decent uk inflation data today. and a t-bill auction in spain. our road map begins with what appear to be significant progress in the debt negotiations overnight. a whose proposal looking to raise rates for those making more than $400,000 a year. but senator corker on squawk just poured a bucket of ice water on those hopes. >> whitney boosts her recommendations on citi, bank of america and discover financial. is that move by one of the more famous financial bears, a sign of a new era for banks? >> walmart is once again the target of a "new york times" investigation. but does the paper add anything new and can the stock outperform just as it did last time. >> private equity firm server said it will sell the firearms conglomerate. is private equity talking about guns in the country. >> futures moving higher on optimism. the white house republicans rising above partisanship, getting closer to striking a deal on the fiscal cliff. we have t
at that and said, you know, this is not too dissimilar from where europe was in the early 1970s. europe grew at about our rate after world war ii. we were pretty much in line until the early to mid '70s, and then all of a sudden they took a significant step down and never caught back up. and they were on a lower growth trajectory. they had taken a ten down and were on a lowerrer growth trajectory. so year after year after year that gulf between us and europe got wider. it's now about 40%. that's a pretty significant gap. we're looking at, you know, just to get back to lucas' chart, we're looking at the beginning of that for us. and we say if we don't get back to ha growth, we could look at -- to that growth, we could look at europe and say that's our future. and since we have the ability to look at what's happening around the world, we can say that's not the future we want. and nothing concentrates the mind like a crisis. or like people being unemployed. i would say 8% unemployment is a crisis in this country. and, you know, i think what you'll see in washington after the politics is done in
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be d
the slots at heathrow. those remain the crown jewel in terms of the airline business going over to europe. if you have access to those slots, it's a much easier way to become profitable or increase your profits over in europe. by the way, there are 31 daily flights between the uk and north america. we'll find out exactly what happens in terms of frequent flier redemption possibilities between delta and virgin atlantic. remember, virgin atlantic is not part of any global alliance, not part of the sky team alliance, although many wonder if that's going to change with some time. take a look at shares of delta. richard anderson has had a nice little move here. some people would say, listen, this is all about jet fuel as it has moderated. there's something else at play here. we'll be talking with richard anderson about this at 11:40, first on cnbc. we'll talk to him after the press conference announcing this deal. you don't want to miss what he has to say. this is a ceo, and we've talked about it several times, who is trying to take the steps that will help delta grow in the future. you look a
. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's one thing for certain, taxes on top earners are going up. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had thi
to happen in europe about the future whether their taxes are going to go aboard not. the problem is if you are holding on to your cash because darrell issa fear you are losing money. is that -- can you get that message out? is there a way to address the people who are so fearful, who don't want to risk a lot of their money but to recognize it just to leave it stand is not helping them at all. >> i appreciate your question. this gets to the heart of the question. people getting so focus on the fiscal cliff that they are missing the big picture. the big picture we are delivered in one way or the other when you think of things in three frameworks the the supergood growth middle and growth dealing with fiscal the leveraging in a small amount and the downside of the fiscal cliff. the first category is not something we can really obtain. the other two are the more likely categories and they are the way to invest in those areas and the portfolio of getting returned in those areas -- [talking over each other] liz: they fan your portfolio. >> they need to give away the more distant up side. don't b
't know about double-digit earnings growth, but credit in europe, and a miracle in japan. it is incredible. earnings are starting to rebound because nominal gdp is increasing and the other thing about volatility, volatility is going lower making what could have been more tight, more stability going into next year. all of these things, they will have a great year as far as price concern. liz: we showed the s&p for the year up about 16% year-over-year. the nasdaq 17%, these are beautiful performances, can they continue through 2013? >> i got asked that question a lot. people say the market is up, they are expensive, that is not necessarily so. the market is up because the consumer confidence and spending and earnings are great and the stock market made up of individual stocks that represent corporate earnings. as i look out into 2013, i see a bunch of tailwind called the energy sector, the housing sector getting a lot better. i agree capital spending and manufacturing is making a renaissance in the u.s. and all that would achieve market make for good earnings. david: i brought it up with our
conference in just a few hours. as for europe, some green arrows, despite a miss in the eurozone in production this morning. >> the road map starts this morning with, of course, the fed. expectations for revamped bond buying program. what will the economic forecast say about next year and what to make of the "wall street journal" story that says academics are driving monetary policy at secret dinners in switzer land. >> more counteroffers in the debt negotiations. it looks like corporate taxes are part of the deductions. >> costco beats by 2 cents, better sales and better sales and membership fees. >> some more reports about apple tv today. the journal said it's designing a high -- new high-resolution set. microsoft trying to widen the list of retailers that will carry the surface tablet. the fed is going to wrap up its two-day meeting. a watch is on to see if ben bernanke and policy makers make a decision about the interest rates. later on, the chairman will hold a news conference, and of course, cnbc, will bring it to you live. coverage beginning at 2:00 p.m. eastern. jim, a lo
, businesses started cutting back aggressively. and i think that was partly because of concern over europe. conference over china. businesses are running very, very clean right now. i do think there's capacity. >> and maybe that business investment will help the consumer who will feel the pinch of higher taxes? >> that's the hope ultimately is that you get that multiplier. businesses and corporations have been doing well, they have cash on the balance sheets and they start lending. i think one of the other crucial components is credit creation. it can't just come from large corporations. it has to come from medium and small bess. >>> coming up, bob doll gives us his outlook for the fed. linking rates to the unemployment rate. then at 8:00 eastern, a cnbc exclusive, david tepper, one of the world's top performing hedge fund managers will give us some of his investing wisdom and what will be a can't miss "squawk box" interview coming right back. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perf
. >> austerity, is the fiscal cliff sort of like austerity? >> absolutely. >> and europe haven't done so severely. >> that's the point. maybe we can put this off, but you can't put off reality. you're going to pay the piper. the question is the creation of washington of the fiscal cliff or a creation of your investors and bondholders across the world that look at you in the same light as europe some day. we all know that day isn't here. this is a lesson for the republican party, and i think it's a lesson we should all take. instead of when we look at all these programs, mark, where are we going to make cuts and how terrible is this going to be, we need to judge our concern and empat empathy, not by the money, something marco rubio and paul ryan talked about, by the outcomes, not how much we spend but what we get out of it. look at something how much money we throw at it we'll august suggest more, more, more. >> government does such a good job tracking outcomes. >> let's track the outcomes of tax loopholes so if we're going to evaluate outcomes it's important to evaluate the outcomes of tax loopho
your vision should be for adapting the paa that's in europe into asia? because leaders here have said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> well, you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it wasn't designed to be in a long-term ballistic missile defense architecture. it still has benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the bmd capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have sbx in that role has diminished over time because other capabilities are mature enough to be able to not have to have it. as far as the ability for the intercepters to be productive, i think you have to look across all of technologies that we've pursued in bmd and recognize the that the significant technological challenges that have been associate with the that program and really i think you have in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've d
of consultation in the international regulators, canada, australia, japan, europe etc. and we continue to work the issue. i would say with banks registering the largest banks registered in the term, we are going to have more issues to sort through and we are committed to soaring through -- >> you are not talking of those that registered when you are making that statement. just the firms that register. >> but i have some expressions from some of the foreign regulators that they feel like some of the guidance may be in conflict with their loan regulator, their own that regulation and i guess that is what i am saying. if they are in conflict how are you dealing with those conflicts? >> the one example was in japan they have a clearing requirement. they actually put in place november 1st and we now have a requirement that we finished in november. there is a conflict because we both say they have to be cleared and registered clearinghouses. yet they have yet to register the london clearing house and we have yet to register the japanese clearing house. we are relieved they can use the japanese clear
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
german blue chips, especially when you consider the fact that we are in and out of recession in europe, we have a real malaise in front of a lot of sectors such as the carmakeres and that hasn't stopped the likes of vw, the likes of porsche, the likes of bmw having a very strong 2012. that's despite the fact that gm's opel said it will cut capacity by 20% in 2013. so we are seeing at the moment a real complacency regarding the fiscal cliff, but it's low volumes here as we enter the last hour or so of trading. back to you. >> we also have some news to bring you, broken last night. i expect john harwood talked about it on the special that we did last night. secretary of state hillary clinton is in a new york hospital this morning being treated from a blood clt clot resulting from a concussion you suffered earlier this month. she had been expected to return to work this week. >>> coming up, deal or no deal? we're going to look beyond the fiscal cliff and what it will mean for the markets. we have jim o'neill. he's going to join us to talk about whether he is bullish for the start of 2013
've been hearing our guests across europe telling us they are worried about the way we can see markets trade lower once people come back and realize we haven't had any agreement reached on the fiscal cliff. and that essential doesn't look likely at this point. >> okay, kelly. i couldn't help detect a little -- i mean, you're over there now. you're international. the most important story of 2013 is something with japan? >> yes, joe. >> though, no, no. it's here. >> yes, yes, nope. >> that's the third biggest thing. that's a little tail. that doesn't wag the big st. bernard that is the united states. >> here is one reason. japan isn't necessarily important because of the size of its economy. so if you're talking about global gpt growth, the u.s. is still the juggernaut there. >> fiscal abyss. fiscal abyss. >> japan is not only the leading gauge of what is happening across europe, but potentially what could happen in the u.s. if these policies aren't -- enough. it's will case of this extremely high debt load, something we're discussing in the u.s. and europe right now. if it manages to en
're beginning to look a little like europe. they are punting. >> the market, as we saw in europe, they rallied the market ahead of what they thought was going to be a deal, kicked the can down the road. in fact, if that's the case. michael may be right there's going to be a framework but not a deal, yes, we rallied the market, they will become disappointed and take it back. >> that's not the case. if you look at what's happening, economy better, earnings solid, interest rates are low. the fed probably this week will announce they are going to continue their policies to flood the system with money. >> but there's your answer. the fed is going to keep pumping the system with money. fundamentally are we really where we should be. >> we're not talking about fundamentals. we're talking about what the market is going to do. there's reality and what the market is going to be. if there's free money, we might be broke but there's free money. >> all right. that sounds like a good recipe. michael, we'll have you back later in the hour. >> kenny, do you buy into the rally. >> you buy into the rally becaus
all over europe. >> yeah, right. >> if she's looking for her next destination, where should she go in europe? >> by train. that's what you do. >> you can sleep on it it's your hotel room for the night. >> it is but by december 31st book this deal. you get a global pass on eurail and it gives you access to 23 separate countries. you can sleep through all of them. >> you don't have to sleep through the country, but on your way to the country. >> exactly. >> skip a night paying for the hotel. two hotel deals. >> first, hilton worldwide, 40% off on weekend stays, that's across all their brands, and the best deal of all is right here in new york you've heard of restaurant week we call the dead week. they are not calling it hotel week from january 4th to the 20th. 26 different hotels here in new york offering deals as low as $100 a night versus $500 and up from that period of time from january 4th to the 20th you cannot beat that. >> i want to travel. >> i love traveling, although thinking about the train, i was once on an overnight train in europe, it literally shu
borrowing like this or we will have the same problems that europe is having. that is one of the frustrating things. they are not theoretical. that's not a classroom exercise. you can look at europe and see what happens if we continue down this path very much longer. >> alex rid man bill clinton's budget director put the bulk of the spending problems on the promises to medicare medicaid and lesser extent social security. >> they will drive federal spending occupy faster nan our economy can grow. revenues won't keep up. we have a problem. if you don't have enough revenues to pay for the spending you have to borrow. on the track that we are on if we go on doing what is in the law over the next several decades, our public debt will rise fast you are than our economy will grow. when that happens you have real problem. you have to pay interest on that debt and creditors see that your debt is rising faster than your economy is growing so they charge more and more. it is a very bad situation. >> arthur brooks with the american enterprise institute finds sur rent debates about higher taxes misguided
and there is some turmoil over europe's economy and the founder of wikilocations continues to be under siege. en toa krause looks at the year's major world news. >> reporter: terrorists launched a deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in libya on september 11th. ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans were killed. the arab spring triggered civil war in syria. more than 40,000 people died as rebels try to force out dictator assad. u.s. troops are now in neighboring turkey. the muslim brotherhood rose to power in egypt after the country's first free election. but hundreds of thousands are rejecting president morci's iron hand. israeli forces bombed gaza for eight straight days in november. retaliating after hamas militants fired long-range rockets across the border. forensic experts exhumed the body of yasser arafat to try to determine if he was poisoned eight years ago. north korean celebrated the firing of a long-range rocket into orbit. many believe the communist nation is advancing its nuclear technologies. taliban gunmen tried to assassinate a pakistani school girl who spoke out ag
, particularly if you were in northern europe. cold, depressing. there was not a whole lot of hope. you know, today, we get beautiful poinsettias sent to us and we have flowers at christmas time. back in the day, they tpt have special delivery overnight -- they didn't have special delivery overnight. dave sort of diamondback time. >> so they said, until we get all those things, we'll set up a little wreath. it was really to mark hope in the coming season that there would be growth of crops and all that kind of stuff. originally, the wreath was made of some greenery, had candles in it. there would be four candles, one candle in the middle and it was looking ahead. >> it was a celebration of the winter solstice more than it was a celebration of christmas. they think the actual wreath that we are so familiar with comes from the ancient roman times when the aristocrats of the roman era would wear what we all commonly know as a wreath on their head. a crown on their head. >> like a crown. >> yeah. so they think that is where the wreath came from and then the wreath has come to symbolize a lot mor
it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you grow a real economy without being able to produce goods in a competitive way. i think that it's important to also understand that there are so many factors that go into the adequacy of an educational system. you've referred to consolidation. absolutely critical. and new york state, 650 school districts. a lot of them, each of whom has their -- has one school bus or some of whom have one school bus and a commissioner transportation. >> oklahoma as tiny as we are have 521 school districts. >> that is a very tough nut politically. because education is always local. and always wants to make sure her kid gets on the football team. and it's hard to change that. but there's enormous, enormous redundancy in expenditures there. and that has to be addressed. also, the nature of the population varies. and that has an impact on the quality of education. and the ability of schools to teach. and the same time we have to recognize that 50 years ago, we had -- there weren't very many opportunities for women. there weren't very many women running sta
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
. investors waiting to see what comes out of the fiscal cliff negotiations and in europe, a choppy start to the trading day. investors are waiting for the results of greece's bond buyback program occurs. joe has some of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or wha
&p looks attractive. the other thing is the policy mandate in places like europe believe it or not for the first time in a really long time they actually may be clearer than the u.s. >> chris, is there something about the fiscal cliff, deal or no deal, that makes you concerned about u.s. equities versus international ones? >> well, yes. but i think it's a relative concern. because i think risk assets around the world are attractively valued right now. but you're absolutely right. regardless of what sort of deal we get today or in the next three months, the fact of the matter is it will have an adverse impact next year. the question is is it going to be bad enough to throw the country into recession or not? we suspect not. and you're seeing today that it looks like a -- that both political sides have been able to find common ground on the tax issue which we think is pertinent in erm thes of the economic impact. but having said that, again, the policy response we think in europe ever since draghi has been in has been consistent and very conducive to risk markets going up. >
the underlying economy is improving. now you get china. if europe can stabilize, i think we can go much higher. >> how many days, if you add headline that monty was thinking about, going out and bursceloni was thinking about coming back. follow me on twitter. and "power lunch" begins right now. >> halftime is over. "power lunch" and second half of the trading day starts right now. >> and here we are. welcome to "power lunch." as you can see, we are beth here on the floor of the new york stock exchange. and stocks are higher as fiscal cliff song and dance continues in washington. mr. boehner says he is waiting for a proposal from this gentleman, the president. president obama. and the president is set to speak about the cliff and the a economy later today. >> i thought i was supposed to come here today. you thought you were supposed to come here today. so we are both here. not really, folks. a lot of talk today is about what investors should do if we go over the cliff. what should we do if there is a debt deal before year-end or shortly thereafter. we have smart strategies and individual stock
. >> they were comfortable, yes. >> what inspired rob cox two, six months before, go off to europe? >> well, this is one of the questions that fascinate me when i started researching the book. he was an idealistic young man. i knew that. he went to a school that, a christian school, and he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be at more than just yourself, and to have meaning and be helpful to others, that kind of thing. there were a few less noble motivations i think. he was graduated from college. he had no other obvious plan, and yet what we would now call a low draft number. he knew that it was a good chance you'll be drafted drafted into the american army, which had resumed the draft in come at the end of 1940. but had no clear plans to actually go to war, and he wasn't too excited i don't think about spending the next couple of years training for military. so he was casting around for something, and i think this fulfill a lot of meaningful, fulfilled a lot of meaningful goals for him. >> how did he get from harvard to england? i mean, who did he contact? >> that's a
to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these companies -- these countries no longer have much and common with each other. >> more with anne applebaum from "iron curtain." sunday night at 8:00 on "q &a." >> president obama talks about friday's shooting in newtown, connecticut. >> on friday we learned more than two dozen people were killed when a gunman opened fire. most who died were young children with their whole lives ahead of them. every parent has a heart heavy with hurt. among the fallen more also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping their children fulfill their dreams. our hearts are broken today. we grieve for the families of those we lost. we keep in our careers the parents of those who survived. as blessed as they are to have children at home, they know their child's innocence has been torn away it far too early. as a nation we have endured far too many of these tragedies over the past few years. an elementary school, a shopping mall in oregon, a house of worship in wisconsin, a movie theater in colorado, countless streetcorners. any of thes
. really appreciate it. >>> it's kind of a blue christmas across much of europe. we are talking about the government's cut back on spending. instead of helping, we'll tell you how it actually spread the recession there. are everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >> i'm saying to all of my family in trenton, njdz, i miss you all and love you all. if you missed, it's your fall. should have watched it. bye-bye. >> thank you for your service, car
phone is or isn't selling. samsung dropping some of is demands against apple technology in europe. dealer incentives on pick-up trucks getting better, general motors offering up to $9,000 off a glut of chevies, and pick-ups, close to $4500 over 2013 models. live at the new york stock exchange, i'm jane king. >>> it is cold this morning. going to get colder? >> yes we will have frost tomorrow morning just about all areas not this morning mainly north bay valleys, apologize, i for to mention, 80 and 50, you need chains. -- some of the clouds hugging the sierra this morning bringing snow there, you can see how unlimited the visibility is right now. let's look at live doppler 7 hd, spinning on top of mount st. helena over the ocean checking out storms that are out there and falling apart as they head towards our neighborhoods. mid to upper 30s fairfield, napa, santa rosa, concord, low to mid 40s for the rest of us, half moon bay warm spot at 48°, upper 30s, watsonville, santa cruz low to mid 40s gilroy and salinas, monterey warm spot, 49. today partly cloudy, showers over the ocean, freezing
're seeing a spike in vix futures. it's indicating more volatility ahead. europe, largely taking the cues from here in the united states, and the news last evening about plan b. we are seeing a 1% loss in italy, germany is down by .9%. >> of course, futures as you saw are taking a hit on concerns that a deal will not be reached to avert that fiscal cliff. an attempt by house speaker boehner to avoid that class and pass the so-called plan b tax bill. that failed. the measure that would have kept current tax rates for those making less than $1 million a year. it never even made it to the house floor. speaker boehner is scheduled to hold a news conference about an hour from now. of course, we'll bring that to you live. >> here we are. >> here we are once again. >> there was no real plan b. there was no real possibility of this. the republicans, the vast majority signed a pledge, they will not vote for tax increase. who would think they would suddenly turn around and vote for a tax increase. they pledged not to. >> the speaker said they might. >> i don't care. >> unless it's some sort of a pl
of the next 10, 15 and 20 years. some people look to europe and say austerity there is not working. and i agree. an austerity program that's too quick can only make our problems worse. but i also see parts of europe that said by kicking the can down the road they can ignore their problems. and the only thing worse than austerity is the bond markets forcing a crisis upon your economy, forcing a crisis that would make a divide between spending and revenues more unsustainable. if we wait 3 years, 5 years, 10 years, 12 years from now we will be unable to safely deal with these problems. that's why we need a balanced and responsible deal now. after the election, many of my colleagues, particularly those on the republican side, have sort of publicly acknowledged that we need new revenue, has to be part of the solution. i believe even some of the numbers the president put forward in terms of revenue goals are too modest in terms of of what is needed to be put back into the revenue stream not to grow the size of government but to simply pay our bills. it is critically important that this new reve
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courte
a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet in the history of economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy self- sufficien
, human rights and democracy across europe for the past six decades. not everyone agreed to this because it is in the middle of a financial crisis that's led to several protests and some say this contra tickets the values of the prize because it relies on military force to secure security -- to ensure security. >>> president obama is heading to michigan to meet with auto workers. the president wants the auto workers to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: dave, president obama is today continuing his push for more public support. he's talking about what will happen to the auto industry if the country falls off the fiscal cliff. let's take a live look now. the president's motorcade is expected to arrive any minute now, then he will be heading to detroit. there's some new hope for a deal after the president and house speaker john boehner held their first one-on-one meeting at the white house in weeks yesterday. now, both sides are mumm about the negotiations -- are mum about the negotiations but say the lines of communications are open. they have 20 minutes to reach an agreement even if th
at the system and buy the debt, and now there's a follow-through in both europe following the same formula. it is a procare yows situation, but everybody's willing to risk it for a temporary good. cheryl: i want to ask you, you talkedded about entitlement reform, but housing. that's been a bright spot we've seen, maybe a lagging indicator of five years, 3:it's on a role. what we're seeing in the economy and housing, negate the problems with the cliff? >> yes, that's exactly the point. housing is so critical to the economy, every increptal -- right now, only talking about 500,000 housing starts. average, historically is a million-one, million-two, million-three. when you double or catchup to the underbuild in the past five years, you can see the entire economy, literally, the entire economy on that straint with little price appreciation. cheryl: thank you, howard. >> thank you. cheryl: stocks cheap, dennis. you like that as well. dennis: what he said. love that guy. now get here from there without fighting about the spouse about it, google stocks higher after the release of the new map app
forecast. europe offers the same lesson in reverse. thank you. as jim says, every time we talk about this, they keep taking the wrong -- lindsey graham said we're going to be greece. yeah, if we do what you want! the best way to generate jobs and growth is for the government to spend more, not less. and for taxes to stay lor owe become lower on the middle class. so you know, just -- >> roosevelt made that mistake in 1937 when the deficit hawks were saying we gotta slow this thing down. things started reverting to the depression era. levels and he quickly changed course. >> stephanie: rise finishes by saying most of the media have bought into the narrative it stems from an out-of-control budget deficit. we're talking about the fiscal cliff. he said -- let's see. interest rates he was talking about are lower than they've been in our living memory. in fact, if there was ever a time for america to borrow more to put people back to work, rebuilding our schools and crumbling infrastructure, it is now. robert reic
to lead the way. china is slowing down. india is slowing down. europe is in a recession. south america is slowing down. we have an opportunity to lead out of this mess. i hope we take the lead. >> jennifer: everyone wants to prevent going over over the cliff you still will have a lot of issues on how best to lead the country forward. allen west will be gone but there will be tea partyers remain. how do you work with people who think compromise is a bad word? >> look, i was just earlier with the republican part of my district today and met with a lot of republican commissioners. the message i told them is what i told everybody. whether you're a republican, democrat, i have an open door. i want to hear your thoughts, your concerns and i want to be your voice in washington, d.c. i plan to represent 100% of this district and being a passionate voice for everybody. i hope i can sit down with everybody in d.c. and whether republican democrat, tea party or not. i want to hear their point of view. i imagine they'll disagree, but i hope this race in particular my defeat of allen west will send
hours flight away from europe. jenna: why would we get involved there in northern mali and not get involved in other spots like syria for example, or in places like yemen where we hear there is a hotbed for terrorists at well? >> well i think part of the reason is that mali for many years a poster child of democracy and alleged stability in this region. it's a very crucial region of the just to the south of it is sub-saharan after can where we derive a great deal of our energy imports. places like nigeria and other places are very sensitive. just to the north this is libya which is still very, very unsettled. algeria which is yet to face the arab spring and reform. and north africa and egypt. this is a very critical region on the boarders of several areas that are very sensitive right now. jenna: what are the islamists doing in that area right now? >> well they're imposing their harsh brand of rule. they have destroyed a number of world heritage sites. islamic monuments ironically enough. they're imposing brutal punishments upon the people. more importantly from the security side t
think the region is in for a long, a longer period of time of changes than central europe face. i think america should play an important role in this. but right now i think our voice has been largely muted by internal divisions, by some ways that we do business in a government and outside of government, that's awesome. the main argument is it's up on us, and more is coming. changes coming. some of that will include islamist forces to figure how to best use our power to shape and influence them. >> thank you very much. on iraq, an extra bonus points if you can believe that -- >> a couple of close in points. first, we we think a luckily, made out to say myself, i think generally weak tend to project a certain bigotry of low expectations on muslims in the arab cultural world. which is those of us who are of various religious faiths here, we know the extent to which we practice our faith to this or that religious prescription, and we now that we've all pretty darn sure but we think muslims, they all pray five times a day, they never touched scotch. they all do, you know, every commandment t
. >> thank you, steve. >>> weaker than expected click reports in europe is sending the region's markets down. overnight the shanghai scored more than 4%. a strong manufacturing report there boosted confidence in the world's second largest economy. that helped hong kong maybe a small gain. taiwan and south korea all ended their trading session overnight with losses. the futures indicate another mixed opening with dow gaining ground. but it did drop almost 75 points yesterday. we're going to talk about more about the fiscal cliff and how it's effecting the markets. the nasdaq starting just below the 3,000 mark today. and keep an eye on adobe systems when it opens. share prices jumped in premarket trading after the company reported better than expected results. adobe earned $220 million for the quarter that ended last month. that is up $49 million from last year. revenue is plat flat. 2013 will be a pivotal year for the transition to a subscription based service including the creative cloud. >>> time now 5:20. you ever think about what other people are searching for online? the most popular thi
security. in latin america, in africa, in europe and elsewhere. the past decade of war has reinforced the lesson that one of the most effective ways to address long-term security challenges is to help build the capabilities of our allies. we have seen this approach with our counterinsurgency campaigns and iraq and afghanistan, and our counterterrorism efforts in yemen and somalia. we are expanding our security forces assistance to a wider range of partners in order to address a broader range of security challenges in asia-pacific, in the middle east. and as i said, in europe, africa and in latin america. to implement this element of the strategy, the services are retaining the security cooperation capabilities we have honed over a decade of war. and making investments in regional expertise. for example, for the armies new structure, they are able to, in fact, engage on a rotational basis to assist other countries. the entire u.s. government is working to make our security cooperation, particularly for an military sales, more responsive and more effective, to cut through the bureaucrac
territory. -- perilous social territory. europe is experiencing the widespread waning of the religious impulse. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory, and ask, with peggy lee, is that all there is? when people decide that the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no transcendent meaning, when they conclude that life should be filled to overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to as which -- assuage the boredom. they might give up the excitements of politics. we know from experience of the bloodsoaked 20th century, the political consequences of this. political nature in the horror of the vacuum. the vacuum of meaning is filled by secular fighting. fascism and communism. fascism -- a meaningful life of racial estimate. communism, adherence to derive meaning from the participation in the drama of history is unfolding destiny. the excruciating political paradox of modernity is this. secularism advanced as part of a moral revolution against the bloody history of religious strife. even those of us who are members of the growing "n
of one of the greatest conflicts this world has known, senator inouye volunteered for service in europe. and in our most decorated military unit, the 442nd combat battalion, he engaged in the fields of europe, in the hill country of italy in a moment of such personal sacrifice and remarkable bravery as to humble any who hear its details. in his service over decades after that moment, he proved what he showed forth on that battlefield -- that danny inouye believed in america even before america believed in him. that even in a moment of such immense injustice in this country, this man's great heart, his aloha spirit, his embrace of the american dream, even in the moment when it was made most bitterly unreal, to thousands of people across this country of japanese ancestry, he led us forward, he pulled us into the greatness that is meant for this country. so the star of senator inouye may have dimmed in this chamber, this chamber that is surrounded in its border by stars, but, mr. president, as i share with you the daily honor of presiding over this chamber, i will in the days and months an
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